Relics from the Front Since 2010
  • Russian blockade hand grenade which is a converted mortar shell to be used as makeshift grenade by the Russian Army the grenade was recovered from the battlefields of Finland from the 1939-1940 war against the Russian army.

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    This is a Russian blockade hand grenade which is a converted mortar shell to be used as makeshift grenade by the Russian Army which is empty and inert. The grenade which is complete with its bakerite base plug which does not unscrew but is maker marked and has its bakerite transit cap at the top which sits into the grenade. The grenade steel case which still retains some original colour the case is a bit pitted with no rust holes it is in very nice condition still its original colour and black paintwork it is very solid not braking up a cracking condition relic that has been very well cleaned and is perfect for display or any collection. The grenade was recovered from the battlefields of Finland from the 1939-1940 war against the Russian army. The grenade comes with A5 laminated information card.

    Russian WW2 "Blockade" Hand Grenade, in other words, 5cm mortar shell which had tail removed and was threaded to take an F-1 type grenade fuze. These are reffered to as Blocade grenades as many of them were manufactured during the siege of Leningrad. In fact these are economy grenades that initially Russo-Finish war in Finland.

    The ‘Winter War’ of 1939-1940, also known as the Russo-Finnish War, saw the tiny Finnish Army take on the might of the Soviet Union’s gigantic Red Army. There was mistrust between the two countries. Finland believed the Soviet Union wanted to expand into its territory and the Soviet Union feared Finland would allow itself to be used as a base from which enemies could attack. A faked border incident gave the Soviet Union the excuse to invade on 30 November 1939. The Red Army was ill-equipped, poorly led, and unable to deal with the Finnish terrain and winter weather. Though small and under-resourced, the Finnish Army was resilient, well-led and was able to use knowledge of the terrain to good effect. Despite the overwhelming odds, Finland resisted for three months with little outside assistance. However, it was only a matter of time before the balance of power tipped in the Soviet Union’s favour. The Red Army came back strongly. Their command structure was reorganised, modern equipment was brought in and there was a badly needed change of tactics and personnel. By early February 1940, the Finnish Army was exhausted, and their defensive lines eventually overrun. Outside help never materialised. Finland was forced to sign the Treaty of Moscow on 12 March 1940, which ceded 11 per cent of its territory to the Soviet Union.

    The Winter War - When the Finns Humiliated the Russians