Relics from the Front since 2010
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     Track link type 5B 1942 pattern which is solid guide horn from German Panzer 4 tank.This link is complete in fantastic condition with all its maker markings and dated 1944 clear to see on the bottom it is rusty but solid condition the cleats are not worn at all looks like unused properly a spare on the side of the tank it has been nicely cleaned and is perfect for display or any collection one of the best panzer 4 track links i have ever had .This track was recovered from the Falaise pocket which was the destruction of Panzergruppe West in the summer of 1944 on the Normandy battlefield.A very nice relic from the famous Normandy battlefield .This link comes with a laminated A5 information sheet with information and photos. 

    THIS ITEM IS FREE UK SHIPPING. FOR INTERNATIONAL BUYERS. IT IS AT A REDUCED RATE. PLEASE ASK BEFORE PURCHASE.

    Panzer IVs comprised around half of the available German tank strength on the Western Front prior to the Allied invasion of Normandy on 6 June 1944. Most of the 11 panzer divisions that saw action in Normandy initially contained an armoured regiment of one battalion of Panzer IVs and another of Panthers, for a total of around 160 tanks, although Waffen-SS panzer divisions were generally larger and better equipped than their Army counterparts. Regular upgrades to the Panzer IV had helped to maintain its reputation as a formidable opponent. The bocage countryside in Normandy favoured defence, and German tanks and anti-tank guns inflicted very heavy casualties on Allied Armor during the Normandy campaign, despite the overwhelming Allied air superiority. However, despite the general superiority of its armoured vehicles, by 29 August 1944, as the last surviving German troops of fifth Panzer Army and seventh Army began retreating towards Germany, the twin cataclysms of the Falaise Pocket and the Seine crossing had cost the Wehrmacht dearly. Of the 2,300 tanks and assault guns it had committed to Normandy including around 750 Panzer 4 Tanks over 2,200 had been lost.

    The Falaise Pocket or Battle of the Falaise Pocket (12–21 August 1944) was the decisive engagement of the Battle of Normandy in the Second World War. A pocket was formed around Falaise, Calvados, in which the German Army Group B, with the 7th Army and the Fifth Panzer Army (formerly Panzergruppe West) were encircled by the Western Allies. The battle is also referred to as the Battle of the Falaise Gap (after the corridor which the Germans sought to maintain to allow their escape), the Chambois Pocket, the Falaise-Chambois Pocket, the Argentan–Falaise Pocket or the Trun–Chambois Gap. The battle resulted in the destruction of most of Army Group B west of the Seine river, which opened the way to Paris and the Franco-German border for the Allied armies.

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